How To Deal With A Depressed Child

Stress, anxiety, and depression are the biggest mental health issues for children and teenagers. For some, the effects of these problems can be so acute and isolating that suicidal thoughts take hold. Young people and children remain vulnerable as mental health issues continue to rise and health services continue to be stretched, identifying and knowing how to address multi moderate mental health issues may help children to avoid increased anxiety and depression. Often those who are experienced in these states are unable to articulate what is happening for them , either because they do not understand why they are feeling that way, they haven’t identified the root cause, because they feel it’s just the way they are, a sense of helplessness, or because they do not possess the language to explain what the cause of the issues may be.

Stress, anxiety, and depression are separate problems and they can exist on their own but they usually feed and cross over into each other. It’s useful to know the symptoms of each of them so that you can begin to look out for your children. However accurately identifying and labeling whether the problem is stress anxiety or depression surprisingly isn’t as important as you may think. What’s more important is what can be done to help. Once it’s clear that there is a problem, it’s important to help the child identify the cause of the unwanted feelings that they have and to relate this to the real fear that is behind that.

For example, after asking a few questions you might establish that your children feels anxious because they do not feel they have revised enough for their exams, you could address this by simply guessing them to do some more revision. But if they genuinely have been putting in the hours already, more revision may cause them to become more stressed. You could help them by saying don’t worry you’ll be, fine but that isn’t addressing the real issue either. The real fear that needs addressing in this particular example is likely to be something like fear of failure and the impact that the failure would have on the lives of them and the other people’s opinions of them. Until that fear of failure is handled, it’s very difficult to obtain a lasting result from any surface-level problems you help them to solve.

If your child has the following signs, so he or she may be depressed:

1.tearful are cranky most of the day. Showing an inability to enjoy the things that he or she used to show.

2.significant changes in weight either up or down 3.sleeping too little at night or too much during the day.

  1. wanting to be alone.

5.lacking energy or feeling an inability to do even simple tasks.

6.feeling worthless or guilty.

7.having trouble concentrating or making choices. 8.having little or no care about the future.

9.having aches or pains when nothing is wrong.

10.thinking frequently about death or suicide.

11.tearful or cranky most of the day. Showing an inability to enjoy the things that he or she used to show.

12.significant changes in weight either up or down.

13.sleeping too little at night or too much during the day.

14.wanting to be alone.

15.lacking energy or feeling an inability to do even simple tests.

16.feeling worthless or guilty.

17.having trouble concentrating or making choice.

18.shaving little or no care about the future.

Depression is not always something you can treat on your own. Schedule an appointment with a doctor. The best way to help your child is to get professional treatment. Tell your child that you’re caring about the way he or he has been feeling. Let him know that depression is normal and that seeing the doctor can help him or her feel much better. Make sure you tell your child to be honest when talking to the doctor so that he or she can get the best health available to overcome depression. Let the doctor know any symptoms you’ve noticed in your child and ask any questions you may have. Remember that when you’re answering questions to also give your child a chance to speak, get a referral to a mental health professional.

Your child’s doctor may refer him or her to a mental health professional. These individuals can help your child manage his or her depression, especially if your child feels comfortable with the person.